Plan

Health and Safety

A total solar eclipse is a mesmerising natural occurrence. Like anything captivating and otherworldly it is tempting to stare at it awe-inspired, and that’s the ultimate goal for anyone partaking in viewing the Ningaloo Eclipse – as long as it’s done safely.

A total solar eclipse is a mesmerising natural occurrence. Like anything captivating and otherworldly it is tempting to stare at it awe-inspired, and that’s the ultimate goal for anyone partaking in viewing the Ningaloo Eclipse – as long as it’s done safely.

Safe Eclipse Viewing

It is never safe to look directly at the sun or a reflection of the Sun – even if the Sun is partly obscured.

Viewing a solar eclipse incorrectly can cause irreversible loss of vision. The retina has no sensitivity to pain and the effects of any damage may not appear for hours. Children are especially at risk due to more light reaching the retina than adults.

A safe way to view an eclipse is via an indirect method such as a pin-hole viewer.

The use of eclipse viewing glasses to directly view the sun is not completely safe. Even where the lenses are certified to meet the applicable standards, improper use of these glasses may still result in serious eye damage.

If using special eclipse viewing glasses please remember the following:

  • Always check the glasses before use. If the lens are scratched or damaged in any way the glasses should not be used and must be disposed of.
  • Ensure the glasses or filters comply with certification standards.

Do not use regular sunglasses, exposed film or x-ray film to view a solar eclipse.

Visit the ARPANSA website for more on eye safety and solar eclipses

COVID-19

Information on COVID-19 can be found on the WA Government website

Got a question to help plan your Ningaloo Eclipse event?

Last Reviewed: 2022-05-09